Covid-19 "what to do" Information Center

KimPossible

Power Poster
I have been wanting to make this since the beginning of the pandemic. But now with cases going higher than ever, everyone should read what to do more than ever.

@DEFCON Warning System could you stickie this?

Hope people will add to what I have already scripted. Hope this helps people.
 
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RiffRaff

DEFCON Staff
Staff member
One comment on pets: So far, bats, cats (both wild and domestic), dogs, and mink have been confirmed to carry the disease and on occasion pass it back to humans. However, it is much more likely that an infected person petting your dog will contaminate the dog's fur, which would then contaminate you when you pet the dog afterward. We do not allow anyone to pet our dog when we walk her and we avoid petting other animals, as difficult as that is to do.
 

KimPossible

Power Poster
One comment on pets: So far, bats, cats (both wild and domestic), dogs, and mink have been confirmed to carry the disease and on occasion pass it back to humans. However, it is much more likely that an infected person petting your dog will contaminate the dog's fur, which would then contaminate you when you pet the dog afterward. We do not allow anyone to pet our dog when we walk her and we avoid petting other animals, as difficult as that is to do.
Added.
 

RiffRaff

DEFCON Staff
Staff member
Here is some information on masks and the protection they do or do not provide. I'm OSHA 10 and 30 trained, so I have some background to speak on this subject. For reference, the virus itself is 0.125 microns in size, but is usually attached to larger particles floating in the air 0.5 microns or larger.

Cloth Masks/Dust Masks - Will provide SOME protection to others if the wearer coughs or sneezes by trapping larger droplets that would be carrying the virus. They will NOT stop all virus particles being exhaled from the lungs. They provide almost ZERO protection to the wearer from other people because there is no seal around the mouth and nose, providing large gaps for unfiltered air to travel when inhaling.

Surgical Masks/Medical Masks - Same as above, but with a slightly higher protection factor, especially in protecting others from the wearer. But they still provide little protection to the wearer from other people due to the lack of a seal around the face.

NIOSH Approved N/R/P 95/99/100 Disposable Masks - The letter designations indicate resistance to oil. The number indicates the percentage of particulate matter 0.3 microns or larger the filter will catch. An N100, for instance, will stop 99.97% of all particulate matter 0.3 microns or larger. These will provide much better protection to the wearer due to the mask's ability to filter out small particles. However, they are not designed to be reused and will eventually degrade with continued use until they no longer offer protection.

NIOSH Approved N/R/P 95/99/100 Respirators - These masks will provide the maximum amount of protection to the wearer from particles 0.3 microns or larger, assuming the wearer has conducted proper fit testing and knows how to put it on and take it off without contaminating himself. HOWEVER, these masks rarely have filtration for exhaling, so they will not protect other people from the person wearing it. These masks can be decontaminated and reused and the filters replaced as needed.

To be clear, *anything* is better than nothing. However, it is important for people to not feel a false sense of security just by wearing a mask. They need to understand the capabilities and limitations of whatever style mask they are wearing. If the mask does not provide a clean seal around the mouth and nose, the wearer is NOT protected from inhaling contaminated particulate matter. They are merely providing some protection to others if they cough or sneeze.

For the record, I wear a N100 respirator when the situation calls for it.
 

Obreid

Power Poster
n95 when good judgment calls for it.

And a Buff neck gaitor to keep the mask police happy and out of my face.

Also I take perverted humor in walking around sometimes with my face covered, hat on and mirrored sunglasses.

An Air born virus is like liquid water. The deeper the water, the more congested the circumstances, the higher the likelyhood your going to get wet.
I noticed it took the media about a month and a half to point out that those n-95 mask that had exhalation baffles on them were doing nothing to protect others from you🤫
 

RiffRaff

DEFCON Staff
Staff member
n95 when good judgment calls for it.

And a Buff neck gaitor to keep the mask police happy and out of my face.

Also I take perverted humor in walking around sometimes with my face covered, hat on and mirrored sunglasses.

An Air born virus is like liquid water. The deeper the water, the more congested the circumstances, the higher the likelyhood your going to get wet.
I noticed it took the media about a month and a half to point out that those n-95 mask that had exhalation baffles on them were doing nothing to protect others from you🤫
Unfortunately, there seems to be a pretty large segment of Indy's population that refuses to wear masks in public, so my priority is to protect myself from them, not others from me. That may seem cold, but I have to draw a line in the sand at some point.
 

KimPossible

Power Poster
Contact the Federal Trade Commission to file a consumer complaint about Covid-19 scams below:
I can't stress this enough. If you get a call for a scam about Coronavirus save number and report to the FTC!

Do your part to protect one another. Now is the time to come together and help each other.
 

KimPossible

Power Poster
CDC updates its guidance for people with Covid-19 who are isolating at home

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its guidance for people who are isolating at home with Covid-19 to prevent transmission of the virus.

They offer one strategy based on time and symptoms, and another approach based on testing.

Someone who has tested positive for Covid-19 and has symptoms may discontinue isolation 10 days after the symptoms first appeared so long as 24 hours have passed since the last fever without the use of fever-reducing medications, and if symptoms such as coughing and shortness of breath have improved.

People with Covid-19 symptoms isolating at home and with access to tests can leave isolation if a fever has passed without the use of medication, if there is an improvement in symptoms, and if tests taken more than 24 hours apart come back negative, according to the guidelines.

The revised guidelines were posed online Friday. The CDC also updated guidance for people who are in isolation after testing positive for Covid-19 but who don't have symptoms. The agency recommended two options: a time-based strategy and a test-based strategy.

A person without symptoms can discontinue isolation 10 days after the first positive test and if they have not subsequently developed symptoms.

"Because symptoms cannot be used to gauge where these individuals are in the course of their illness, it is possible that the duration of viral shedding could be longer or shorter than 10 days after their first positive test," the CDC warned.
Viral shedding means a person can pass the virus to someone else.

If a person develops symptoms, then the symptom-based or test-based strategy should be used, according to the guidelines.

People who have tested positive for Covid-19 and are asymptomatic can also discontinue isolation if the results of two tests taken more than 24 hours apart come back negative.

Viral shedding means a person can pass the virus to someone else.

If a person develops symptoms, then the symptom-based or test-based strategy should be used, according to the guidelines.

People who have tested positive for Covid-19 and are asymptomatic can also discontinue isolation if the results of two tests taken more than 24 hours apart come back negative.

The decision of ending isolation "should be made in the context of local circumstances," the CDC advised. Health care workers who are in close contact with vulnerable populations and people who are immunocompromised — which could prolong viral shedding after recovery — are recommended to isolate for longer.

The CDC noted the updated guidance may "appear in conflict" with the recommendations for people known to have been exposed to the virus. The agency recommends a 14-day quarantine after exposure, based on the time it takes to develop illness from the virus.

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Sunshine

Member
CDC updates its guidance for people with Covid-19 who are isolating at home
The CDC noted the updated guidance may "appear in conflict" with the recommendations for people known to have been exposed to the virus. The agency recommends a 14-day quarantine after exposure, based on the time it takes to develop illness from the virus.
I have to say I found this very confusing the first time I read it. Seems like every week the guidance gets changed.
 

RiffRaff

DEFCON Staff
Staff member
I thought the quarantine time for exposed people has always been 14 days. I went through that myself clear back in March.
 

KimPossible

Power Poster
guess I find it confusing too but I felt like posting it here because it did come from the CDC.... and this thread is for "guidance" sooo.... take it as you will. :unsure:
 
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willrod1989

Well-known member
guess I find it confusing too but I felt like posting it here because it did come from the CDC.... and this thread is for "guidance" sooo.... take it as you will. :unsure:
This is pretty prudent advice, surprisingly enough. Studies have shown that people shed the most virus from 48 hours prior to symptom onset up to 72 hours after symptom onset. Viral shedding decreases significantly after 7 days from symptom onset, especially if the fever has broken. However, keep in mind that not everyone will have a fever- my brother dealt with the coughing, pneumonia, and shortness of breath, but never had a fever.

FYI, this will be my last post for a few days, as I'm getting ready to head up to Oregon for a much needed break. But if anyone has any questions, feel free to DM me and I'll get back to you as soon as I can!
 
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