Disasters & House Animals

KimPossible

Power Poster
Its not really talked about or probably even thought what will you do with your pets during a Disaster. Do you have plans for your little loved ones once the bombs drop? Do you have enough ration for them? Are they fit, young, and trained enough to hunt?

In any scenario are your animals tamed enough to listen and come at your command, or would you be wasting valued time chasing them to get them to safety, instead of heading for shelter or prep for impending attack.

There is one fact we all know and most of nature can out run us even with our fancy gizmos. So having animals fight nature for your food is a big benefit, but if your animal is older, or a cat and not able to hunt what poses the purpose of saving them?

Can your animal defend you from unwanted guests?.... There are a lot more things to think of but these are just from the top of my head. Please comment on what your incite is about this subject.
 

RiffRaff

Deputy Director
Staff member
People are going to have to make a lot of hard decisions in an EOTWAWKI scenario. We have no children (and if we did, I would see to it that we didn't). We have a Giant Malamute and a medium sized cat, both about the same age. The Malamute can hunt small game and offers early warning/defense against intruders. She will earn her keep. Sadly, the cat doesn't do much but eat, sleep, shit, and throw up. We don't have a mouse problem, due in part to her, probably, but she won't be be worth feeding if SHTF. We do keep an emergency supply of pet food in our shelter, so it won't be an instantaneous thing. Once that runs out, though, we'll need to discuss turning her loose in the wild where she has no experience hunting or defending herself, or just putting her down as humanely as possible.

We are well-prepared to take care of our pets during a temporary crisis. But if it's going to be a long-term survival situation, anything that consumes resources without providing a tangible benefit will have to go.

Sadly, a lot of people won't understand this, to their detriment.
 

KimPossible

Power Poster
Yes, very well thought out and great decisive thinking. Saddly not a lot of people like you said will not understand or be able to cut lose any "third leg" that will end up holding you back or even worse causing your own demise. Animals will be a big undecided and unthought of challenge when it comes to disasters and I don't think many will be ready to depart from there little loved ones. This is why I started this thread, its tough to think or talk about as I view my animals as my own kids just like many others here i am sure. But its a eventuality that will come up during a disaster, and better to think and plan now then at the heat of the moment.
 

RiffRaff

Deputy Director
Staff member
The hard decisions don't stop with animals, unfortunately. That newborn baby's crying might give away your hiding place. Not to mention, it's going to be at least 5 years before that child can start contributing to resources instead of just consuming them. The 90 year-old grandparent is in the same boat, although they might have important knowledge they can teach to others. Handicapped children or family members? Not real conducive to surviving a long-term disaster. The diabetic uncle? Once the insulin runs out, what do you do?

The only way through this is to think about it in advance, because if you don't, you'll be making emotional decisions under extreme stress rather than logical plans considered and thought out without the stress of whatever disaster has occurred. And that means almost all the decisions made will be bad ones.

At least one person in every surviving family or group is going to have to be cold enough to carry out what no one really wants to do, but is necessary for the continued survival of the group.
 

old goat

New member
I have had lots of time to think about this, due to the pandemic. Heck , I got married during the pandemic. Now my wife and Belgian Shepherd Dog are included in the plan.
Bond is perfectly capable of hunting, herding and contributing to security needs. In no way is he getting left behind. My wife has MS and it is the same for her. Not getting left behind.

Not everyone feels the same way. I get that. It is all about your personal feelings on the matter. My group is absolutely fine with this.
 

Obreid

Power Poster
Offal
the first thing a wild animal including your pet will eat off a fresh kill is what you will never touch anyway.
boil it or roast it on the fire to minimize parasites if you can.
Very few wild animals will eat the meat first thing. They let the meat marinate a few days to tenderize if there is no competition to consume it right away.

This where all the crazy cattle mutilation stories come from
“Oh the eyes the lips toung and genitalia were missing. Must be alien experiment or satanist”

first things first and that’s the soft exposed parts then the offal.
so give them what they will eat naturally anyway.
Dog food for the short term to maintain civility but beyond that they and you will have to figure it out because that’s just the way of things.

I’ve always maintained dogs don’t eat kibbles because they prefer it. But because their owners do.
Hard to snuggle with a hound who just choked down a young rabbit whole. 🤣
You just scratch their ears and say “good boy, now go away before you cough the dang thing up on the porch.”
 
Its not really talked about or probably even thought what will you do with your pets during a Disaster. Do you have plans for your little loved ones once the bombs drop? Do you have enough ration for them? Are they fit, young, and trained enough to hunt?

In any scenario are your animals tamed enough to listen and come at your command, or would you be wasting valued time chasing them to get them to safety, instead of heading for shelter or prep for impending attack.

There is one fact we all know and most of nature can out run us even with our fancy gizmos. So having animals fight nature for your food is a big benefit, but if your animal is older, or a cat and not able to hunt what poses the purpose of saving them?

Can your animal defend you from unwanted guests?.... There are a lot more things to think of but these are just from the top of my head. Please comment on what your incite is about this subject.
what would i do with my pets??? probably eat them... i know that comment probably just horrified some, but the truth is, at some point you will run out of supplies. at that point, fluffy will taste as good as anything else, and be less dangerous to procure then going out scavenging in a wrol/shtf type of society..
 

RiffRaff

Deputy Director
Staff member
I have determined that I would rather starve than eat my pets.

I know, easy to say now. But when it comes down to it, yeah. Not eating them.
Well, the cat goes first. We have an emergency supply of cat food for her, but once that's exhausted, she gets turned loose outside. She contributes nothing toward long-term survival. The dog, however, gets to stay, and will eat our leftovers once her emergency food stocks run out. She *does* contribute to long-term survival as a watchdog, guard dog, hunter, and general deterrent. Plus if we have to go mobile she can carry a small pack of supplies.

All that being said, I'm not above killing a family pet for food, but if we're to the point where that is the only food available to us, we're only prolonging our own deaths by a few days at most by doing that, so what's the point? I will always save two .50 caliber hollow points with magnum loads for my muzzleloader if it comes to that. Quick and painless.
 
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