EPA Abandons Major Radiation Cleanup in Florida

DEFCON Warning System

Director
Staff member
That was a long article.

One part did make me look twice:
However, at the 500-millirem-per-year level, the cancer risk for humans is roughly 1 in 40, the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry noted in a 2006 internal report it prepared regarding the Florida dispute.

The article states this without context, but the implication is that 1 in 40 would get cancer who would not otherwise get cancer.

I'm finding it difficult to believe that 500 mrem would cause that dramatic of an increase in cancer rates, especially since background radiation is 300 mrems. Though background radiation and radiation specific to the site are be caused by different things. I do not claim to be an expert, however. There are others on staff who know more about radiation than I do. I'm just expressing a personal thought process.

Again, later in the article it claims that "[at 100 millirems of radiation per year], about one in 300 people would be expected to develop cancer." Another number that makes me wonder where they are getting their numbers from.

It makes me wonder, without being conspiratorial about it, how much is documented, scientific fact and how much is sensationalizing a subject.
 

DEFCON Warning System

Director
Staff member
For the curious (or sadistic), the Environmental Protection Agency has a webpage where you can calculate the amount of radiation you are exposed to on a yearly basis. It doesn't count if you are sitting on a pile of nuclear waste or anything like that, but it is an educational look at what is going on around you.

http://www.epa.gov/radiation/understand/calculate.html
 
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