Taiwan & China Crisis

expat42451

Active member
Just found this FWIW......

Interesting. I still wonder if and if so how many of the silos are wooden airplanes
 

Yingyang

Well-known member
Just found this FWIW......

Interesting. I still wonder if and if so how many of the silos are wooden airplanes
Doubt it. China has had underground cities occupied and able to survive nuclear war for years. People put in to climatize and survive a major conflict.
 

Ben Dhyani

Active member
Russia and China send a message...
Chinese and Russian nuclear-capable bombers conducted a "joint patrol” over the Sea of Japan in a military gesture that dramatized Russian President Vladimir Putin’s vow to remain unified with his communist neighbor. “Some of our Western partners are openly trying to drive a wedge between Moscow and Beijing,” Putin told his foreign policy team in a Thursday speech. “We are well aware of this. Together, with our Chinese friends, we will continue responding to such attempts by expanding our political, economic, and other cooperation and coordinating steps in the world arena.”
https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/...na-and-russia-vow-not-to-let-west-divide-them
 

expat42451

Active member
Hey Obreid
I agree its not a good sign but --may be the result of whats been going on in China with the internet and data control for the last few months. A lot of things there seem to be changing as they harden their internal policies. Is it done maliciously and with forethought of some military action or an unintended consequence of other internal internet/data laws enacted? Dont know. What it will do in those congested waters is result in headaches for harbor traffic control authorities and possibly more hazardous navigation problems for ship masters. What is interesting to consider is that the AIS transponders on ships wont change either in technology or utilization.... what has changed is the access to said data by people outside of China. The reasons remain somewhat of a mystery.

In looking at shipsnow.com what is reported is borne out. If you examine the Chinese coast around places like Putain and Fuzhou you see near coast and inshore ships, even those that are moored or at dock- reporting sat-ais - where before they would have appeared differently when the ais data was displayed as a reult of the ship transponder being picked up by a shore station. If you look across the strait at Taiwan, at ships in harbor and near coast you see a different and more detailed information presentation on ships inshore or moored, their data from shore side ais receivers. Interesting question that I do not know the answer to is whats the difference in the accuracy of the position, heading and speed (for those ships close to shore that are under way) as reported by the shore based ais units vs satellite and what is the interval of update difference. Granted that any ship can turn off their ais transponder and effectively disappear from the system (military vessels do this frequently from what I am told) but what we have now makes it harder to see movements of ships that may be part of the dual use push for every Chinese flagged merchant ship to have use as both commercial and in time of need, military..... interesting no?? Also as an aside here ais positions represented by any ship on the map are a result of not the ais system determining the ship position. Ais is strictly a data reporting -- the ship's position as it appears on t he map is is from a GPS/GLONASS receiver used for navigation on the ship transmitting its position through the ais system from what I know.
 
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Obreid

Power Poster
Hey Obreid
I agree its not a good sign but --may be the result of whats been going on in China with the internet and data control for the last few months. A lot of things there seem to be changing as they harden their internal policies. Is it done maliciously and with forethought of some military action or an unintended consequence of other internal internet/data laws enacted? Dont know. What it will do in those congested waters is result in headaches for harbor traffic control authorities and possibly more hazardous navigation problems for ship masters. What is interesting to consider is that the AIS transponders on ships wont change either in technology or utilization.... what has changed is the access to said data by people outside of China. The reasons remain somewhat of a mystery.

In looking at shipsnow.com what is reported is borne out. If you examine the Chinese coast around places like Putain and Fuzhou you see near coast and inshore ships, even those that are moored or at dock- reporting sat-ais - where before they would have appeared differently when the ais data was displayed as a reult of the ship transponder being picked up by a shore station. If you look across the strait at Taiwan, at ships in harbor and near coast you see a different and more detailed information presentation on ships inshore or moored, their data from shore side ais receivers. Interesting question that I do not know the answer to is whats the difference in the accuracy of the position, heading and speed (for those ships close to shore that are under way) as reported by the shore based ais units vs satellite and what is the interval of update difference. Granted that any ship can turn off their ais transponder and effectively disappear from the system (military vessels do this frequently from what I am told) but what we have now makes it harder to see movements of ships that may be part of the dual use push for every Chinese flagged merchant ship to have use as both commercial and in time of need, military..... interesting no?? Also as an aside here ais positions represented by any ship on the map are a result of not the ais system determining the ship position. Ais is strictly a data reporting -- the ship's position as it appears on t he map is is from a GPS/GLONASS receiver used for navigation on the ship transmitting its position through the ais system from what I know.
Too me it sounds like what your reporting isn’t that ships will be ghost as far as being in a small geographic location. But that the details and more precise location will be withheld.
If I’m understanding you right it sounds like it’s a nuisance and safety issue.

All this falls right in line with chinas claim the the SCS is theirs to administer and regulate. Licensing - coastal inspections out for hundreds of miles.
An attempt to force compliance with their sweeping claims of ownership of the SCS.
Makes it easier for them to disrupt other nations shipping fishing and drilling in the SCS
 

RiffRaff

Deputy Director
Staff member
Too me it sounds like what your reporting isn’t that ships will be ghost as far as being in a small geographic location. But that the details and more precise location will be withheld.
If I’m understanding you right it sounds like it’s a nuisance and safety issue.

All this falls right in line with chinas claim the the SCS is theirs to administer and regulate. Licensing - coastal inspections out for hundreds of miles.
An attempt to force compliance with their sweeping claims of ownership of the SCS.
Makes it easier for them to disrupt other nations shipping fishing and drilling in the SCS
Would this also fall in line with the chatter we've been hearing about China converting civilian ships to military use in preparation for invading Taiwan?
 
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